v31#4 September, 2019 Table of Contents

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ATG v30 #1 Table of Contents PDF

Full Issue – Read Online Now

ISSUES, NEWS, & GOINGS ON

Rumors – p. 1

From Your Editor – p. 6

Letters to the Editor – p. 6

Deadlines – p. 6

FEATURES

Assessment in Libraries — Guest Editors: Shannon L. Farrell and Kristen L. Mastel

Assessment in Libraries p.1 by Shannon L. Farrell and Kristen L. Mastel Outreach activities have traditionally not been formally assessed, or if they were, they focused on simple quantitative measures like head counts.  This issue of ATG aims to examine some of the major issues and also provide incisive commentary from a range of contributors.

Enhancing the Rigor of Common Library Assessment Activities p. 14 by Craig E. Smith Craig limits the scope of this article to assessment involving human data, and to a small number of ways of increasing rigor that are not overly burdensome.  This is an observation of places where relatively easy opportunities for improvement exist.

Outreach Assessment: A Two-Pronged Approachp. 17 by John Jackson The mother lode of outreach assessment will be found when someone develops a way to combine multiple data points into a single indicator of success.

Asking the Right Questions: Bridging Gaps Between Information Literacy Assessment Approaches p. 20 by Alison J. Head, Alaina C. Bull and Margy MacMillan Drawing on combined experience at community colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada and Project Information Literacy (PIL), this article introduces a typology for classifying and critiquing four levels of information literacy assessment — micro, meso, macro, and mega.

Assessing Print Acquisitions at UMN Libraries p. 24 by Julie Rashid This article attempts to pull out the highlights of recent acquisitions assessment initiatives (2005-2014), outline current assessment activities (2015-present) and reflect on what the future may hold for print acquisitions.

Assessing e-journal post-cancellation access p. 28 by Sunshine Carter and Yumiko Toyota-Kindler A post-cancellation access determination (PCAD) project uncovered various challenges unique to serial publications.  The authors share their experience with determining PCA at the University of Minnesota and outline recommendations for other PCA projects.

Assessing the Success of Library Published Journals p. 30 by Emma Molls This paper will discuss UMN Libraries Publishing’s development of journal-level goals to assess publication-level success and, in turn, assess the success of a library publishing program.

Assessing Library Competencies for the Future: The LibGOAL Toolkit for Success p. 33 by Steven Bell, Marta Brunner, Jennifer Ferguson, Elliot Felix, Emily Kessler, Kelly Sanford, and David Woodbury This article will detail the process by which a group of thinkers and doers came together to identify essential competencies and develop a toolkit to help both new and seasoned academic library professionals prepare for their future.

Op Ed — Epistemology – Power, Control, and the Quest for Open Infrastructure p. 36 by T. Scott Plutchak Every one of us operates out of a multiplicity of motivations in almost everything that we do yet every organization that has a mission needs to have a sound financial structure. 

Back Talk- Speaking of Bathrooms? p. 94 by Jim O’Donnell Jim stresses that good restrooms make for good students who get good grades.  And student success is our day job.

ATG INTERVIEWS & PROFILES

Karen Phillips p. 38 Senior Vice President Global Learning Resource, SAGE Publishing

Kiren Shoman p. 38 Vice President Pedagogy, SAGE Publishing

Henry Owino p. 41 by Matthew IsmailHenry, formerly Manager of Collection Acquisition Services at Qatar National Library, now in a new position at the University of New England.

Jason Dewland and Yvonne Mery p. 44 Associate Librarians, Research & Learning, University of Arizona

Theodore Pappas p. 46 Executive Editor and Chief Development Officer at Encyclopaedia Britannica

Profiles Encouraged p. 83 In this issue we have many people profiles, some company profiles, and several library profiles as well.

REVIEWS

Collecting to the Core- Gegenwartsromane, Contemporary German-Language Novels p. 47 by Heidi MaddenMonographic works that are essential to the academic library within a particular discipline.

Reader’s Roundup-Monographic Musings & Reference Reviews p. 50 by Corey SeemanWhen asked to do the impossible, the industrious Corey does.  Now he features both library-focused works and reference works with a new title, recalling “Woody’s Roundup”from Toy Story 2!

BookloverLiquidation p. 53 by Donna JacobsDonna’s next Nobelist choice, Imre Kertész’s Liquidation — a random selection from the list of Nobel Literature Laureates “because the novel’s title was delightfully intriguing.”

ATG Food + Beverage Roundup- Charleston, SC p. 70 by Nicole Ameduri and Melanie Masserant — We are printing this column early to give us all time to plan our visit to Charleston restaurants!  Read on!

LEGAL ISSUES

Edited by Bruce Strauch and Jack Montgomery

Legally Speaking- The Complications of Open Educational Resources p. 54 by Anthony Paganelli

Cases of Note-Immoral Trademarks p. 55 by Bruce StrauchIancu, Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director, Patent and Trademark Office v. Brunetti.

Questions and Answers-Copyright Column p. 56 by Laura N. Gasaway — As always, Lolly features many relevant questions and answers.  A public librarian asks about copying book jackets for display or to be included in the library’s calendar of monthly events.  Is this permissible? Lolly tells us.

PUBLISHING

Bet You Missed It p.12 by Bruce StrauchWhat do Stacy Keech and Clint Hill have in common?  Read it here!

The Scholarly Publishing SceneBill Begell’s Legacy p. 57 by Myer KutzA riveting look at a very special man and publisher with a legacy.

And They Were There-Reports of Meetings p. 58 — In this issue you’ll find Ramune’s fourth installment of reports from the 2018 Charleston Conference.

Don’s Conference Notes p. 76-by Donald T. Hawkins and Leah Hinds2019 ACRL Conference: Recasting the Narrative

BOOKSELLING AND VENDING

Little Red Herrings-Missing Piece of the Puzzle? p. 10 by Mark Y. HerringReading is like a muscle that develops with practice.

Marketing Touchpoints-Putting Marketing Planning in its Place p. 60 by Jill HeinzeWhen it comes to any sort of large-scale planning exercise, there seem to be two kinds of people:  Those who recoil in horror and those who eagerly welcome the process.

Optimizing Library Services-Food for Thought: Leveraging Library Services to Address Food Insecurity p. 62 by Kymberly Goodson and Rachel ConryFood for Fines drives, while more common in public libraries, are relatively simple to organize and have many benefits for academic libraries and the populations they serve.

Biz of Digital – Developing and Growing a New Repository Service: Part 2 Procedures for Library Submissions p. 72 by Michelle FlinchbaughInitial procedures and documentation for an operation relying on one librarian were an important stepping stone.  While they weren’t completely satisfactory, or always thoroughly documented, opportunities for changes were identified.

Mayflower: Ode to New Beginnings-Beautiful Connector: Collection Showcase Exhibits as Teaching Tools and Community Builders p. 80 by Antje MaysExhibits for showcasing collections and related research strategies can prove effective in helping campus communities more fully harness the power of library resources in their research.

TECHNOLOGY AND STANDARDS

Library Analytics: Shaping the Future-The SPAN Monograph Project: Shared Print Archiving in Western Canada p. 68 by Jean Blackburn and Lisa PetrachenkoA distributed model of shared print archiving can effectively contribute to solving the problem of preserving the print scholarly record into the future.

Let’s Get Technical-St. Thomas Library, Automating for the Future p. 65 by Tia Felock and Rebecca DeJesus  — How a regional organization helped a private elementary school automate their catalog.

Headwaters-The Subversion of Referees p. 66 by Kent AndersonHas the human referee declined in many parts of daily life?  A new provocative column.

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