News & Announcements 12/23/14

by | Dec 23, 2014 | 0 comments

unpacking_booksMEDLINE Indexed 765,000 Citations, Retracted 400 Articles, and PubMed Received More than 2.7 Billion Searches in FY 2014; Selected Peer-Reviewed Papers From “Faster, Smarter, Richer: Reshaping the Library Catalogue” (FSR 14) available; Shared Print Programs, SPEC Kit 345, Published by ARL; IMLS Welcomes Input on Its Website Redesign; eReaders Are Bad For Sleep; Do e-readers really harm sleep? Depends what you call an e-reader; UK government publishes long awaited science and innovation strategy, leaves many questions unanswered; Max Planck Society and ScienceOpen sign Open Access publishing deal

MEDLINE Indexed 765,000 Citations, Retracted 400 Articles, and PubMed Received More than 2.7 Billion Searches During FY 2014

InfoDOCKET notes that “yesterday was the last time … the National Library of Medicine updated their Key MEDLINE Indicators chart with FY 2014 indexing and usage numbers for MEDLINE/PubMed. The chart also includes data back to FY 2010. Charts with indicators data back to 1996 are also available…

The complete indicators chart has all of the data along with several important footnotes.”

Selected Peer-Reviewed Papers From “Faster, Smarter, Richer: Reshaping the Library Catalogue” (FSR 14)

InfoDOCKET also report that “the selected papers, in English, are published in a special issue of JLIS.it (Italian Journal of Library of Information Science) Vol. 5, No. 2 (2014).

Faster, Smarter, Richer: Reshaping the Library Catalogue” (FSR 14) took place on February 27-28, 2014 at the Vatican Library in Rome. The complete program is available here.

Shared Print Programs, SPEC Kit 345, Published by ARL

“ARL has released Shared Print Programs, SPEC Kit 345, which explores the extent of ARL member libraries’ participation in concerted efforts among groups of libraries to collaboratively collect or retain print collections and provide access to them. The SPEC Kit covers the type and scope of programs in which ARL libraries choose to participate, the rationale for participation, the value and benefits the programs provide to ARL and other libraries, and the roles different libraries are playing in the programs…”

IMLS Welcomes Input on Its Website Redesign

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has begun an effort to redesign its main website, www.imls.gov. The agency’s website users are important stakeholders in inspiring libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. In order to achieve this mission, we are looking for input on ways to improve the IMLS website…

We want to know more about our current website visitors, and how they use www.imls.gov, in order to build a website that best meets their needs. We are asking for input into the website redesign via an online survey, which we estimate will take 10 minutes to complete. The survey will remain open through January 9, 2015.

Click here to take the 10-minute survey.

eReaders Are Bad For Sleep

GalleyCat reports using an eReader before bed “could be having a negative effect on your sleep, according to a new study from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers looked at the sleep quality of people who had read on a light-emitting eReaders before bed and compared the results with the quality of sleep achieved by people who read print books. The report revealed that using devices before bedtime delays the circadian clock and suppresses the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin in the body…”

Do e-readers really harm sleep? Depends what you call an e-reader

However, this article in GIGAOM offers a less alarmist perspective noting that “the key problem with this study …, is that when it says “e-reader”, it means “Apple iPad”… “there’s a huge difference between an iPad and an e-ink reader such as those in the Amazon Kindle, Kobo or Barnes & Noble Nook ranges. The study does not once mention e-ink e-readers. The iPad was also “set to maximum brightness throughout the four-hour reading session, whereas, by comparison, the print-book condition consisted of reflected exposure to very dim light…”

FamilySearch Adds More International Indexed Records and Images

ResourceShelf reports that “FamilySearch adds more than 1.3 million indexed records and images to Brazil, Canada, China, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 269,011 indexed records from the Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902–1980 collection; the 199,157 images from the China, Collection of Genealogies, 1239–2014 collection; and the 155,719 indexed records from the Canada, Canada Census, 1911 collection…”

UK government publishes long awaited science and innovation strategy, leaves many questions unanswered

KnowledgeSpeak reports that “the UK government has published its long awaited science and innovation strategy, but many of the questions asked by the science community will not be answered until the next spending review. The strategy re-iterated capital spending plans set out in the autumn statement, but does not commit to ringfencing the science budget or to increase R&D expenditure in line with competitors.

Max Planck Society and ScienceOpen sign Open Access publishing deal

KnowledgeSpeak also notes that “the Max Planck Society (MPG), an independent, non-profit German research organisation, and ScienceOpen, the research + Open Access publishing network based in Germany and the USA, have signed an agreement that will allow authors affiliated to MPG as members of one of its 82 institutes and research facilities, unlimited free publication of posters and research articles in 2015. ScienceOpen facilitates immediate publication of research papers on its platform and aggregates nearly 1.4 million Open Access (OA) articles from other leading publishers.

 

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